What you missed at TIFF 2018

The Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) is a film festival held annually and is one of the biggest publicly attended film festivals in the world.

The Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) is a film festival held annually and is one of the biggest publicly attended film festivals in the world.

Skyler DiLoreto, Staff Writer

          Each year TIFF is held in downtown Toronto, operating out of the TIFF Bell Lightbox. Founded in 1976, TIFF has become a permanent destination for film culture since its creation. The self-proclaimed mission of the festival is to “transform the way people see the world, through film.”

The festival begins the Thursday night after Canadian Labour Day and lasts 11 days; in this time screenings, lectures, discussions, workshops, industry support and the chance to meet filmmakers are offered. It has become one of the most prestigious events of its kind, being recognized by Time in 2007 as it has “grown from its place as the most influential fall film festival to the most influential film festival, period.” This is most notably because of its ability to create “Oscar buzz.”

The festival’s popular People’s Choice Award, which is based upon balloting of the audience, has been shown to continuously have winners that have gone on to become nominated for and to win Oscars. A few examples of this are La La Land, Slumdog Millionare and American Beauty. The People’s Choice Award for 2018 was received by Green Box from director Peter Farrelly, with first and second runner up for the award being If Beale Street Could Talk from director Barry Jenkins and Roma from director Alfonso Cuarón, respectively.

The festival has also been praised for its forward thinking and steps to foster more diversity in film making and reviewing. This year the festival announced that at least 20 percent of the press accreditations given to film critics and journalists would be received by groups that have historically been underrepresented in the field, such as women and people of color.

While the festival is most famous for its People’s Choice Award many other notable awards are given, such as the Documentary and Midnight Madness awards. The festival is also noteworthy for its recognition of Canadian filmmaking through three major Awards given: Best Canadian Film, Best Canadian First Feature Film, and Best Canadian Short Film. The festival also recognizes international films and through the Platform Prize.