Strange physics

A voyage into the deepest depths of physics concepts

Things are getting a little weird in physics town.

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Things are getting a little weird in physics town.

Ben Chong, Staff Writer

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There are a lot of physics principals that many of people are unaware of, things that actually affect our world every single day. This article will dig deep in the realm of physics. First I will premise this article with saying what exactly physics is. Physics is the study of the universe and everything in it, as well as how the entities in our physical dimension react and affect each other. Most people think physics simply explains why most things happen the way they do, and in its simplest definition, yes, this is what physics is. With that said there are a lot of things that physics can’t yet explain but as more formulas and relationships are made and developed, I’m sure everything will be explained in due time.

The first thing I wanted to describe is a little thing called quantum super positioning. Quantum physics studies miniscule particles and how they relate to each other; this includes particles much smaller than an atom. Have you ever heard of Schrodinger’s cat? This is actually one of the best and simplest explanations of quantum superposition. Schrodinger’s cat is a sort of paradox where if you put a cat in a box with poisoned food or a bomb or some other method to kill it, that while it’s still in the box the cat could be either dead or alive, which means that the cat is in a superposition of being dead and being alive. There is also a relationship between the possible outcomes of the cat and the method of killing it. If it’s a bomb in the box with the cat, then the cat is alive if the bomb hasn’t exploded, and the cat is dead if the bomb has exploded… unless it’s some sort of super cat. So, without looking in the box we, the observers, are forced to believe that the cat is both alive and dead, as well as if it’s alive the bomb hasn’t blown up, and if the cat is dead, it has.

Special relativity is another advanced physics topic that takes into account different points of reference that normal Newtonian mechanics doesn’t explain. Einstein came up with the theory of relativity and this is one of the points that made him so famous. Normally using Newtonian mechanics you can take the velocity of one object with respect to another object moving at another velocity by using Velocity1-Velocity0= Relative velocity. This shows how fast two objects move from each other. But his theory of relativity explains why certain things remain the same speed no matter how fast the observer moves. With this explanation arises a topic called time dilation. Time dilation states that time is relative to the speed of the thing that is moving and its relativity to other objects. Basically this states that an object moving at a different speed on a different heavenly body experiences time differently than those on earth. Pretty cool, right?

So, now you know that if something is uncertain and only has X possibilities, you technically assume that it is in all X states unless it is finally revealed which state that situation is in. You can also now tell people that different objects experience time differently from each other, so here the true question arises… is this special relativity and time dilation actually time travel? But that is for you to answer.

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