Keep calm and procrastinate on

The art of just not being in the mood to do an assignment right now.

If+it+works+for+SpongeBob%2C+maybe+it+can+work+for+you.
If it works for SpongeBob, maybe it can work for you.

If it works for SpongeBob, maybe it can work for you.

If it works for SpongeBob, maybe it can work for you.

Emily Galka, Staff Writer

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Are you a real procrastinator or have you escaped the trap?  Procrastination is defined as the action of delaying or postponing something or everything in some cases.  If you are a procrastinator, you can either work to fix your so-called “problem” or just embrace it and stick with your newfound talent; it’s safe to say that most high school students end up sticking to their new talent. A 2014 study shows that 86% of high school students procrastinate, 87% of college students procrastinate, totaling to an average of 88% of student based procrastination.  If you do well with procrastination stick to it; do whatever helps you make the grade and do well on tasks.

 

High school students aren’t the only ones to procrastinate; even people such as Leonardo Da Vinci were known for never completing different works in a timely manner but still managed to become a great success.  Who doesn’t have at least a little idea of what the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper are?  Proof that procrastination really does work.  Student Anna McCormick talked about, her success in procrastination on a biology project freshman year. She said, “I walked into class putting on the final few pieces of my cell cake and still managed to make an A.”  Who knows?  Maybe your procrastination could bring  great fame and fortune; avoiding a math assignment could end up with a genius idea.  I can see it now–your name in lights.

 

Procrastination only becomes an issue when you have to ask yourself the infamous question of  “What did I do wrong here?” If your success in doing work well has declined along with your grades and such, and you aren’t asking yourself the infamous question you might need to use some of these tips.

 

  1. Make a plan: one night you can setup an outline, the next you can work on pieces and parts and then soon enough you’re finished on time
  2. Reward yourself: Say after 20 minutes of working you will take a ten minute break; check your phone, eat a snack, whatever you please for ten minutes.
  3. Prevent distractions: turn off your phone, or set it to do not disturb; just focus.

If you aren’t looking to fix your procrastination, just completely discard all of the tips above and keep calm and procrastinate on.

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