Step aside Christmas cookies: it’s turkey time

Thanksgiving cookies are here- and they’re 10x cooler.

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Honey baked ham in a cookie? A movement.

Honey baked ham in a cookie? A movement.

Honey baked ham in a cookie? A movement.

Riley Fitzpatrick, Staff Writer

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The very second the clock strikes midnight on November 1st, the Halloween festivities end and the sleigh bells start ring-ting-tingling-too. Nearly everyone immediately skips over the best holiday of the year- Thanksgiving. Sure, it doesn’t have a plethora of festive anthems of jolly figures to back it up as a superior holiday. However, as I’ve recently found, Thanksgiving has some cookies that are only acceptable during its time of year. Although they might be a bit frightening to hear about, they’re good.

       Step aside peppermint cocoa and sugar cookies- ham holiday cookies are here. Meat in a cookie? I get it, it doesn’t sound appealing. But if you don’t take risks, your life (and your tastebuds) would be utterly boring. Which is why you should try this recipe:

 

Ingredients

  • ½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, cut into large pieces
  • ½ teaspoon coarse salt
  • 1 cup salt
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 4 large eggs
  • ½ cup finely chopped or ground Black Forest Ham (2 ounces)
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1 cup finely shredded Gruyere cheese, plus 36 cubes (½ inch) for centers (8 oz total)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Bring butter, salt, and the water to a boil in a large, heavy saucepan over medium heat, stirring occasionally (butter will melt). Add flour; stir vigorously until incorporated. Continue to cook, stirring, until the mixture pulls away from sides of pan and a thin film forms on bottom of pan, 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from heat; let cool 2 minutes.
  2. Transfer dough to a large bowl; add eggs 1 at a time, beating with a wooden spoon to incorporate each before adding the next, about 2 minutes. Stir in pepper, ham, and shredded cheese.
  3. Spoon dough into a pastry bag fitted with a 1/2-inch star tip. On a baking sheet lined with a Silpat baking mat or parchment paper, pipe 1 1/2 inches wide rosettes, 1 inch apart. Make a deep indentation at the center of each with your thumb (dampen thumb to keep it from sticking to dough). Bake until crisp and golden, 25 to 30 minutes.Transfer thumbprints to a wire rack to cool completely. Press a cheese cube into indentation of each.
  4. Place on clean baking sheets; freeze (uncovered) until firm, about 1 hour. Transfer to an airtight container; freeze until ready to use, up to 6 weeks.
  5. To serve, preheat oven to 425 degrees. Place thumbprints on ungreased baking sheets; bake until heated through and cheese is melted, 10 to 14 minutes. Serve warm.

 

I 100% guarantee that these will be the most interestingly, confusingly, yet beautifully delicious cookies you will ever try.

Along with the ham, another Thanksgiving table staple is the pumpkin pie. And the dessert is almost as glorious of a treat in a cookie form. I’ve never been too much of a fan of pumpkin pie’s mushy-center. These cookies, which are perfectly soft with a crunch around the edges are beyond satisfying.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pouch of Betty Crocker sugar cookie mix
  • ¼ cup of cold butter
  • 7 oz cold cream cheese
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
  • 3 tbsp. canned pumpkin
  • 2 tsp. all-purpose flour
  • ¼ teaspoon pumpkin pie spice

Directions

  1. Heat oven to 350°F. Generously spray bottoms and sides of 24 regular-size muffin cups with cooking spray. Place cookie mix in large bowl. Cut in butter and 4 oz cream cheese, using pastry blender or fork, until mixture is crumbly. (Do not overmix.) Reserve 1 cup cookie mixture for topping; set aside. Firmly press 2 tablespoons remaining cookie mixture evenly into bottom of each muffin cup.
  2. In small bowl, add 3 oz cream cheese and stir until smooth. Add remaining pumpkin filling ingredients; mix well. Place 1 rounded teaspoon pumpkin filling in center of each cookie. Sprinkle each with 2 teaspoons reserved cookie topping.
  3. Bake 18 to 20 minutes or until edges of cookies are golden brown. Cool completely in pan, about 30 minutes. Run metal spatula around edge of cookies in muffin tin to loosen.

 

Even though Christmas has a large variety of treats and cookies, there’s no reason that Thanksgiving should be overlooked as a cookie contender. After all, what other time of the year is it acceptable to put ham or pumpkin into a cookie?

 

 

 

 

 

 

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