The blobfish

It%27s+so+ugly+it%27s+kind+of+cute.
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The blobfish

It's so ugly it's kind of cute.

It's so ugly it's kind of cute.

It's so ugly it's kind of cute.

It's so ugly it's kind of cute.

Calena Lopez, Staff Writer

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The blobfish is a very ugly creature, but don’t be fooled by its looks. The blobfish is an incredibly interesting sea goblin and has many amazing facts behind its existence. First discovered in 2003 by an unknown fisherman, the blobfish made its appearance to the world, although most people were terrified by it, scientist were fascinated by it. They decided to name it the Psychrolutes marcidus. Facts today state that the blobfish is usually found between 3,000 and 4,000 feet below the sea’s surface. Due to the pressure at that depth, they have little to no bones or muscles, relying on the pressure to keep their body composition well.

 

Blobfish are commonly found in the waters of Australia and New Zealand, where they float around the seafloor and suck in small creatures like crabs and shellfish. They can reach 12 inches and weigh up to 20 pounds. Unlike many fish, the Psychrolutes marcidus lacks a swim bladder to keep float and buoyancy, so in substitute, they have a single air sack that does all the hard work for them. Female blobfish lay thousands of pink eggs on the seafloor while the males sit on them, protecting them from many potential threats. Scientists believe the average lifespan for the blobfish is around 120 to 130 years, which is a very long time to just be floating around the seafloor doing absolutely nothing.

 

Of course, all living things have their downsides to them, and for the blobfish its extinction. Many scientists believe the blobfish is facing a mass extinction throughout their population, and the main problem starts with fishing. When bought up with nets that fishermen use, the dramatic change in pressure can kill them instantly. If they manage to survive the pressure change, that doesn’t mean they’ll live. Fishermen usually keep them on the boat to die due to them not having any market value, which dramatically lowers their population rate. Ugly and going into extinction… sad.

 

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