Hurricane Florence

Projected+path+of+Florence.+%28Image+obtained+from+Accuweather.com%29
Projected path of Florence. (Image obtained from Accuweather.com)

Projected path of Florence. (Image obtained from Accuweather.com)

Projected path of Florence. (Image obtained from Accuweather.com)

Uroob Saeed, Web Editor

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Sunday morning, 74 mph tropical storm Florence became a hurricane 720 miles southeast from Bermuda, according to the National Hurricane Center. The hurricane is moving west 7 mph with 84 mph winds. It is projected to become a Category 4 hurricane and move towards the Carolinas by the end of this week, as it continues to gain power from the warm waters each day. Residents of South Carolina and the Mid-Atlantic region were advised to prepare for the hurricane, as it may cause 1 to 2 ft. rain in some areas and possible flooding. Though the Miami-based Hurricane Center said it was too early to tell the exact path of the hurricane, the East Coast should begin to prepare for the worst. Counties in South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia have already begun to hand out sandbags to the people who were told to gather supplies like water, food, and gas in case evacuation is called for. South Carolina’s emergency management agency said it was “preparing for the possibility of a large-scale disaster.”

The hurricane shifted a little southwest, aiming farther inland then previously predicted. It is expected that coastal areas receive 20 inches of rainfall, with some areas reaching 40 inches. Duke Energy- the main electricity supplier of North and South Carolina- estimated that 3 million people will lose electricity during the duration of the storm. So far, 88,000 homes are without power, according to the North Carolina Emergency Management.  Thankfully, the hurricane became a Category 2 with winds reaching 100 mph. However, even though the wind power decreased, Florence is still expected to dump 13 trillion gallons of rainwater. That’s enough to fill more than 15 million Olympic-size swimming pools! The highest waves could even reach 83 feet. The state of Georgia declared a state of emergency, joining Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, and South Carolina. About 1 million people are under mandatory evacuation, with more than 6,700 people spending Wednesday night in 147 Red Cross shelters in Virginia and thee Carolinas. In addition, more than 1,300 flights from the US East Coast have been cancelled. There is no major effect of Florence on Florida at the moment, other than rougher seas and apparent elevation in sea level.

 

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