SpaceX has another successful launch

“For the first time in history, there is a commercial capability from a private sector entity to safely and reliably transport people to space.” - Phil McAlister

“For the first time in history, there is a commercial capability from a private sector entity to safely and reliably transport people to space.” – Phil McAlister

Jacob Reiter, Staff Writer

This past Sunday on the 15th SpaceX sent up the Crew Dragon spacecraft to deliver four astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS), Michael Hopkins, Victor Glover, and Shannon Walker from NASA, and Soichi Noguchi from Japan’s space agency JAXA. In addition to the astronauts, baby Yoda made an appearance as the crew’s “zero G indicator” to determine when the crew reached orbit when he started floating about the capsule bumping into just about everything. The Crew Dragon spacecraft was designed to be reusable in the fact that the first and second modules are designed to return to Earth and recovered after being detached during launch, this exact same spacecraft was used in a launch earlier this year in May. This alone deserves celebration because the technology used to make this feat possible was only made just a few years ago and has already sent two crews to the ISS. The main thing workers at SpaceX are celebrating is that this mission marks their first fully operational crewed mission to the ISS. Earlier this year in May SpaceX did another launch as a proof of concept to see if they could send astronauts to the ISS to prove to NASA that their technology could handle the trip. Another Crew Dragon launch is scheduled for spring of next year, dubbed Crew-2, that will also be sending astronauts to the ISS. The innovation that NASA and SpaceX are accomplishing together is renewing the country’s interest in space travel, and more specifically the government’s. It is likely that NASA will receive more government funding with the increased amount of launches they’re doing in combination with SpaceX’s drive to someday colonize Mars. Ever since the conclusion of the space race, government funding for NASA has decreased greatly over time. With increased funding, the world is fast approaching the days of private space travel, opening the doors for even further exploration into the vast open expanse of the solar system. Personally, I would like to be directly involved with this exploration as one of NASA’s or SpaceX’s engineers.