Philosophical web story by Michael Del Duca

"Deep" is often not the most accurate of terms.

Michael Del Duca, Sports Editor

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Recently, I was told by a certain English teacher and a close friend of mine (both will remain unnamed) that I am unable to write a deep article. They believe that my articles lack the depth and perception of a quality article. Well, I want nothing more in the remainder of my life than to prove these two wrong. In just 300 words, I will do that and much more.

First things first, what does the word “deep” truly mean? It can be used in a variety of ways, but in this case, it is used to measure somebody’s complexity. I don’t believe that this is a fair use of the word; just because somebody can create a perplexing statement that makes someone think does not mean they are mentally superior to the other. This statement, which could be either intellectual, emotional, or just down right confusing, should not be able to be summed up by just four letters. Each of these scenarios is disparate from the others and deserves its own description, rather than being lumped together as “deep.” The intellectual side should be described as such, not “deep,” rather “scholarly,” “cerebral,” or even “highbrow.” If we are discussing something emotional, instead of telling your peer that their statement was “deep” you can say it was “sensitive,” “impassioned,” or “sentimental.” And finally, the most important, if someone utters a ridiculously perplexing statement that makes no sense, rather than complimenting them by saying, “Wow, that was so deep,” you need to tell them something different. “That made no sense,” “What are you talking about?”, or maybe even “Are you on drugs?” if the statement entices that response.

The moral of this story is that no matter what, you need to let people know when they make speech errors. Don’t congratulate them; let them know that they make no sense and make it evident that you are not following. Your response to this web story may be that, and if so you can contact me at @Michael_DelDuca on twitter and let me know how you feel.

 

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