Is one political ideology going to have an absolute hold on the country soon?

The House of Representatives in the process of doing their duties.

The House of Representatives in the process of doing their duties.

Jacob Reiter, Staff Writer

As it stands currently the executive branch of the government is Republican, the Senate is 53% Republican, the House of Representatives is mostly Democrats, and five out of nine Supreme Court Justices are Republican. However, due to the upcoming election the relative balance that we see right now may soon be to change.

Over the weekend Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died; she was one Democrat of the four that were Justices. After Trump’s election in 2016 Ginsburg was very vocal about her disapproval of the President and actively used her power as a Justice to limit him in whatever way she could. She even went so far as to refuse to retire even though she was 87 because she didn’t want Trump to replace her until she died. Unfortunately, she had been fighting cancer for the past few years and had died due to the associated health complications. The main controversy that her death is a part of goes back to about 8 weeks before the 2016 election. Barack Obama was still president and Supreme Court Justice Antonin Gregory Scalia had just died, meaning Obama had the right to appoint a new Justice that the Senate could approve or disapprove. The Senate, which was majority Republican, ruled that Obama’s recommended Justice be ignored because it was too close to the end of his term and that the next president should be able to appoint the new Justice. Now, the Senate is faced with the same problem, but it is likely that since the Senate is majority Republican, they will allow Trump to appoint a Justice for the third time in his four years as president. Despite this decision being hypocritical, only three Republican senators need to “cross the aisle” and vote with the Democrats who don’t want Trump to appoint another Justice before election day. The main reason that allowing Trump to appoint a third Justice would upset the relative balance of the Federal Government is because that would mean that the Supreme Court Justices would have a 6 to 3 ratio of conservatives to liberals, meaning that instead of only needing one Justice to “cross the aisle” they need two, which in today’s political climate is near impossible. Many of the current conservative Justices want to undo laws that were passed that go against their values, the most vocal one they have wanted to repeal is the law that allows women to choose whether or not they want to have an abortion. Additionally, they wish to repeal the Affordable Health Care Act, which would cause those who are suffering due to COVID and relying on the reduced cost of health insurance to suffer even more. Regardless of the morality of undoing those kinds of laws having 6 conservative Justices, a majority Republican Senate, and a possible re-election of Trump would make the conservative ideology’s power extraordinarily exceed the liberal’s, meaning that nearly the entire federal Government would be of one ideology, meaning that if they want to pass a law that benefits only them and not the general public, there would be little in the way of stopping them.