Ichiro retiring

Following the conclusion of the Opening Series in Japan, Ichiro will announce his retirement.

Ichiro+says+goodbye+to+fans+in+Japan+at+the+Tokyo+Dome+on+March+21%2C+2019+believed+to+be+his+final+game.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Ichiro retiring

Ichiro says goodbye to fans in Japan at the Tokyo Dome on March 21, 2019 believed to be his final game.

Ichiro says goodbye to fans in Japan at the Tokyo Dome on March 21, 2019 believed to be his final game.

Ichiro says goodbye to fans in Japan at the Tokyo Dome on March 21, 2019 believed to be his final game.

Ichiro says goodbye to fans in Japan at the Tokyo Dome on March 21, 2019 believed to be his final game.

Cory Fakterowitz, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






After 28 years of professional baseball split between Japan and the MLB, legendary Japanese born Ichiro Suzuki, better known as just “Ichiro,” as he is the only the second player to ever wear just his first name on the back of his jersey rather than the typical last name, is announcing his retirement. This helped his name catch on especially his Japanese fans who absolutely love Ichiro as he is considered essentially a god in Japan. While in Japan, Ichiro amassed 1,278 hits in the Nippon Professional Baseball League in Japan for the Orix BlueWave and 3089 hits in the MLB for the Seattle Mariners mainly but also played three years in both New York for the Yankees and for the Miami Marlins. When you combine those hits, he has a total of 4,367 hits, which surpasses Pete Rose, who is often called the hit king with 4,256. However, Rose’s are all in the MLB. So while Ichiro isn’t the MLB hit king, he is sometimes referred to as the actual hit king and often raises the debate as to if Ichiro came to play in the MLB earlier, would he have passed Rose. Ichiro did not play in the MLB until age 27, meaning that Ichiro could easily had played another 6-8 years in the MLB and he was past his prime when he came over. In that 2001 season, Ichiro set a rookie record 242 hits while winning a Gold Glove and hitting 3.50 with 56 stolen bases. He was the first rookie to lead those two categories since Jackie Robinson had done so in 1949. Not only does he own the rookie record for hits, but he also set the record for the most of all time in one season with 262 in 2004.

Ichiro will finish his career with 10 MLB AllSstar appearances, an MVP award (2001) , Rookie of the Year (2001), 10 Gold Gloves. As for NPB stats he was a 7-time all-star, 7 Gold Gloves, and 3-time MVP. All in all, Ichiro will go down as one of the best to ever play the game in the entire world and played a major role in opening the door for future Japanese players such as Yankees legend Hideki Matsui, as well many others who followed in his footsteps. Ichiro will always be a loved icon by both Japanese and American players and the game won’t be the same without him.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email