Potentially Record Breaking Weather

The+lowest+natural+temperature+recorded+at+ground+level+on+Earth+is+-128.6+%C2%B0F+at+the+Soviet+Vostok+Station+in+Antarctica+on+July+21%2C+1983+by+ground.+Photo+provided+by+usatoday.com.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Potentially Record Breaking Weather

The lowest natural temperature recorded at ground level on Earth is -128.6 °F at the Soviet Vostok Station in Antarctica on July 21, 1983 by ground. Photo provided by usatoday.com.

The lowest natural temperature recorded at ground level on Earth is -128.6 °F at the Soviet Vostok Station in Antarctica on July 21, 1983 by ground. Photo provided by usatoday.com.

The lowest natural temperature recorded at ground level on Earth is -128.6 °F at the Soviet Vostok Station in Antarctica on July 21, 1983 by ground. Photo provided by usatoday.com.

The lowest natural temperature recorded at ground level on Earth is -128.6 °F at the Soviet Vostok Station in Antarctica on July 21, 1983 by ground. Photo provided by usatoday.com.

Lianys Olmeda, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Be glad you live in Florida because the weather we are currently experiencing must feel like summer to those up North. A perilously cold-air outbreak reached the Great Lakes and the Midwest on Tuesday and will last multiple days and might just break dozens of records. The Midwest this week will experience a portion of the polar vortex, which is the pool of subfreezing air that usually moves over the Arctic Circle. The coldest it’s going to get is across a region from North Dakota south into Missouri and all the way to Upstate New York. These temperatures will be as much as 50 degrees below average. The lowest temperature on record for Chicago was set on January 20, 1985 at minus-27 degrees. However, this record might be beat with a forecast of minus-29 degrees. Not only is this temperature shockingly cold, but also incredibly dangerous. The National Weather Service in Chicago says this week’s forecast presents “life-threatening extreme cold that can lead to rapid onset of frostbite and hypothermia.” In fact, a minus-20 degrees win chill can cause frostbite in just 30 minutes. However, the people in the Upper Midwest won’t have as much time as that since the wind chill temperature there will fall as low as minus-65 degrees.

This cold weather and air is moving behind an Arctic front that brought several inches of snow to the aforementioned regions this weekend. People are preparing and stocking for the coming cold. It was advised by the National Weather Service that people should “stock up between now and Monday evening so outdoor time is minimized.” The National Weather Service in Chicago has also said that the temperatures in its forecast are the coldest in 25 years for the area. The Washington Post has also reported that “dozens of cities have forecasts at least within one degree of record cold temperatures, including Chicago, Des Moines, Cleveland, Detroit and Minneapolis.”  For most Floridians this weather is unimaginable; however, there are some that have experienced extremely cold weather. Senior Danielle Barnych said, “When I was a little kid I would go to Michigan with my family and the first time I saw snow, the weather was so cold that I couldn’t move my feet and they turned blue. I was too young to really know what the exact temperature was, but it was definitely in the negatives.” Newspaper advisor and English teacher Tara Barbieri, who grew up in Ohio, has many memories of dangerously cold winters as well. “One of the coldest I ever experienced I was in elementary school, it was Super Bowl Sunday, and it was negative 25 degrees out. It was so cold we couldn’t even heat our house properly, so we watched the Super Bowl in our sleeping bags and bundled up with jackets. There were times in high school I’d have to boil water and dump it on my car door so I could open the frozen car and drive to school.” Fortunately, though, we don’t have to deal with this kind of weather in the sunshine state.  The most we have to do is put on a warm sweater, and head out the door.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email